latin for bear

latin for bear


ursa


Ursus is a genus in the family Ursidae (bears) that includes the widely distributed brown bear,[3] the polar bear,[4] the American black bear, and the
Asian black bear. The name is derived from the Latin ursus, meaning bear.[5][6]

A hybrid between grizzly bears and polar bears has also been recorded. Known commonly as a pizzly, prizzly, or grolar bear, the official name is simply “grizzly–polar bear hybrid”.

The mating systems within the genus Ursus are primarily classified as polygynous, polyandrous and promiscuous.[10] Both males and females mate with more than one partner and use various strategies to increase their reproductive success.[10] Since bears are sexually dimorphic, sexual conflict is a primary driving force behind sexual selection influencing intra-sexual and inter-sexual competition.[10] Unlike more social species bears, being solitary mammals, have wide-ranging habitats to locate potential mates.[11] Due to the asynchrony of oestrous phases and lengthy parental care by females, bear populations are usually male-biased, meaning that females are more choosy and males are more competitive.[12] Intra-sexual selection is then characterized by male-male competitions influenced by female mate choice.[10]

Mating seasons fluctuate based on species dependent on geographical location.[12][13] American black bears (Ursus amercanus), brown bears (Ursus arctos) and polar bears (Ursus maritimus) all have mating seasons occurring within a three-month duration during the spring and summer months (approximately May – July), with delayed implantation occurring in late fall (November), and cubs born within the den during early winter (January).[12][13] Females, on average, mate with three to four males during a mating season and mating males have more variation, mating with one to eight females during a mating season.[10] Since reproductive success is positively correlated with age and size in bear populations, there are also males that do not mate at all until they are able to compete with larger males.[10] There is a very loose dominance hierarchy within bear mating systems due to their solitary nature.[10] Majority of dominance hierarchies are found at food congregations in which population density is high and individuals are ranked based on size, mass, aggressiveness and willingness to fight.[10] Overall, dominance hierarchies have lower adaptive strategies in solitary species and dominance is established based on encounters during the breeding season.[11]

latin for bear

The mating system is generally characterised by two main components, the search phase and the encounter phase.[13] During the breeding season, both males and females expand their home ranges to help increase the likelihood of finding potential mates.[12][14] Males, especially, adapt a roaming strategy, covering a large geographic range to find receptive females and tracking them via chemoreceptors.[12] Male bears are not considered to be territorial, but they do have large home ranges that may overlap with female home ranges, giving them access to a range of 3-15 females.[14]

Males compete for females using contest competition, scramble competition and sperm competition as mechanisms for sexual selection.[12] The pre-copulatory mechanisms, including contest and scramble competition, are conditional mating tactics that are used based on an individual’s phenotype.[11] Males that are larger in size compete more in physical contests to access potential mates, while males that are smaller or medium-sized use scramble competition as a strategy by increasing their ranges to encounter potential mates.[11] Age and size are positively correlated and as males age, they grow in size and experience, monopolizing receptive females.[11] Observations of broken canines, cuts, wounds and scars demonstrate the costs associated with contests and the importance of physical intra-sexual conflict within polygamous mating systems.[12]

There is also post-copulatory male-male competition that has been documented in species within the genus Ursus. The presence of dual paternity within a litter implies that sperm competition may take place after copulation.[11][14]

Another male strategy observed by male bears is sexually selected infanticide.[13] This results in males killing the offspring of other males to directly and indirectly improve their own reproductive success.[13] This can directly influence their success by mating with the female when she re-enters oestrus or indirectly by lowering intra-sexual competition with other males and resources.[10]

Female choice is based on the cost of searching for a mate and the quality of a mate.[13] Since females are induced ovulators, studies suggest that they may have control over the paternity of their offspring.[13] This may be done through pre- and post-copulatory counter-strategies that involve cryptic female choice and sexually selected infanticide.[13] The hypothesis of sexually selected infanticide is a female counterstrategy that can directly and indirectly improve their fitness.[10] This is done by selecting for infanticidal males to enforce mate and offspring recognition and indirectly by mating with multiple males in order to have multiple paternity.[10][11][14]

Within Ursus, there may be a high variation within the mating strategies observed by both females and males, demonstrating overall plasticity depending on external factors.[10][11] This demonstrates the conditional mating tactics that male bears may consider based on their age and size,[11] as well as the counter-strategies of females, including sexually selected infanticide and cryptic female choice.[10]

We got five translations of bear in English-Latin dictionary with synonyms, definitions, examples of usage and pronunciation.

We also found the following translation(s) related to bear.

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From Middle English bere, from Old English bera, from Proto-West Germanic *berō, from Proto-Germanic *berô (compare West Frisian bear, Dutch beer, German Bär, Danish bjørn).

This is generally taken to be from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerH- (“shining, brown”) (compare Tocharian A parno, Tocharian B perne (“radiant, luminous”), Lithuanian bė́ras (“brown”)), related to brown, bruin, and beaver.

The Germanic languages replaced the older name of the bear, *h₂ŕ̥tḱos, with the epithet “brown one”, presumably due to taboo avoidance; compare Russian медве́дь (medvédʹ, “bear”, literally “honey-eater”).

However, Ringe (2006:106) doubts the existence of a root *bʰer- meaning “brown” (“an actual PIE word of [the requisite] shape and meaning is not recoverable”) and suggests that a derivation from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰwer- (“wild animal”) “should therefore perhaps be preferred”, implying a Germanic merger of *ǵʰw and *gʷʰ (*gʷʰ may sometimes result in Germanic *b, perhaps e.g. in *bidjaną, but it also seems to have given the g in gun and the w in warm).

bear (plural bears)

latin for bear

bear (third-person singular simple present bears, present participle bearing, simple past and past participle beared)

bear (not comparable)

From Middle English beren (“carry, bring forth”), from Old English beran (“to carry, bear, bring”), from Proto-West Germanic *beran, from Proto-Germanic *beraną, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰéreti, from *bʰer- (“to bear, carry”).

Akin to Old High German beran (“carry”), Dutch baren, Norwegian Bokmål bære, Norwegian Nynorsk bera, German gebären, Gothic ?????? (bairan), Sanskrit भरति (bhárati), Latin ferre, and Ancient Greek φέρειν (phérein), Albanian bie (“to bring, to bear”), Russian брать (bratʹ, “to take”), Persian بردن‎ (bordan, “to take, to carry”).

bear (third-person singular simple present bears, present participle bearing, simple past bore or (archaic) bare, past participle borne or bore or (see usage notes) born)

*Archaic or obsolete.

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  • bear (uncountable)

    Middle English bere (“pillowcase”), of obscure origin, but compare Old English hlēor-bera (“cheek-cover”). Possibly cognate to Low German büre, whence German Bühre, which in turn has been compared to French bure.

    bear (uncountable)

    bear m pl

    From Old Frisian bera, from Proto-West Germanic *berō, from Proto-Germanic *berô.

    bear c (plural bearen, diminutive bearke)

    en

    large mammal of family Ursidae

    Fleeing a bear, he runs into a lion.

    Fugiens ursum, incidit in leonem.

    en

    large mammal of family Ursidae

    en

    to be equipped with

    latin for bear

    “It will likewise redound to your honour that you have raised to the highest places men who could also bear moderate fortune.”””

    “hoc quoque in tuam gloriam cedet, eos ad summa vexisse, qui et modica tolerarent.”””


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    edo [edare, edidi, editus]▼ verb(1st) TRANS

    fructifico [fructificare, fructificavi, fructificatus]▼ verb(1st) INTRANS

    pario [parire, peperi, paritus]▼ verb(4th)

    ursus [ursi]▼ noun(2nd) M

    latin for bear

    acanthos [acanthi]▼ nounM

    acanthus [acanthi]▼ noun(2nd) M

    accongero [accongerare, accongeravi, accongeratus]▼ verb(1st) TRANS

    gesto [gestare, gestavi, gestatus]▼ verb(1st)

    veho [vehere, vexi, vectus]▼ verb(3rd)

    gero [gerere, gessi, gestus]▼ verb(3rd)

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  • perveho [pervehere, pervexi, pervectus]▼ verb(3rd)

    suffero [sufferre, sustuli, sublatus]▼ verb

    tolero [tolerare, toleravi, toleratus]▼ verb(1st)

    perfero [perferre, pertuli, perlatus]▼ verb

    duro [durare, duravi, duratus]▼ verb(1st)

    abfero [abferre, -, -]▼ verbTRANS

    ursinus [ursina, ursinum]▼ adjective

    fructifero [fructiferare, fructiferavi, fructiferatus]▼ verb(1st) INTRANS

    testor [testari, testatus sum]▼ verb(1st) DEP

    aufero [auferre, apstuli, ablatus]▼ verbTRANS

    alterno [alternare, alternavi, alternatus]▼ verb(1st)

    defero [deferre, detuli, delatus]▼ verb

    ecfundo [ecfundere, ecfudi, ecfusus]▼ verb(3rd) TRANS

    effundo [effundere, effudi, effusus]▼ verb(3rd) TRANS

    tolerabilis [tolerabile, tolerabilior -or -us, tolerabilissimus -a -um]▼ adjective

    tolerabiter [tolerabilius, tolerabilissime]▼ adverb

    barbitium [barbitii]▼ noun(2nd) N

    alopecuros [alopecuri]▼ nounF

    barba [barbae]▼ noun(1st) F

    barbiger [barbigera, barbigerum]▼ adjective

    barbatus [barbata, barbatum]▼ adjective

    imberbis [imberbis, imberbe]▼ adjective

    imberbus [imberba, imberbum]▼ adjective

    impubes [(gen.), impuberis]▼ adjective

    impubis [impubis, impube]▼ adjective

    inpubes [(gen.), inpuberis]▼ adjective

    inpubis [inpubis, inpube]▼ adjective

    gerula [gerulae]▼ noun(1st) F

    gerulum [geruli]▼ noun(2nd) N

    latin for bear

    gerulus [geruli]▼ noun(2nd) M

    12>↑


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    latin for bear
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